A Night at San Siro Stadium

By November 16, 2016Other, Travel

I finally made it to my first european football game, or in american terms, my first european soccer game at the legendary San Siro stadium in Milan. The National Team of Italy vs. the National Team of Germany. Two very well known teams, but I’m not here to pretend like I know anything about who is better or who even the players. I’m here for the experience.

I don’t often go to sporting events. Maybe the thanksgiving UT football game, maybe a major league baseball game if I’m in town, the olympics when it’s on TV, etc. What’s fun about a live event is the energy and the crowd, similar to the experience I would get at a concert or festival. I knew that europeans can get rowdy at matches, so I was excited to embrace the energy with open arms.

Outside of San Siro Stadium

Outside of San Siro Stadium

I wasn’t able to sit with my friends because I had bought a ticket way later and they block the different sections off, and frankly I did not want to mess with any security guards here. I was sitting next to a couple of italian guys, who occasionally would give me a few pointers on what was happening. I played soccer as a kid, so I knew the rules, but there were a few things that confused me. For instance there was no clock counting down the time left in the game. All I could find was a screen displaying the score, which remained 0-0 the entire game. There was a 3 minute warning, and halftime seemed pretty short.

The colors in the crowd seemed pretty strange as well. There were many italia flags, but only a few hats and shirts supporting the team. The rest of the crowd was a sea of black and navy jackets, typical milanese. I saw “the wave” being done for a good 5 seconds, but only on the upper tier. Sometimes they would chant “I-TAL-IA” over and over in support. A couple times people started jumping up and down and doing some other chant in italian. I guess it’s a good way to keep warm. There was lots of cheering and noise. Whenever kickoff happened or a goalie would kick the ball the crowd would go “ahhhhhhhhh-AH” with the last part going off as the ball flies through the air.

Cheering on Italia for the win (well the draw)

Cheering on Italia for the win (well the draw)

The strangest thing of all to me was at the end of the game, the ref blew the whistle and everyone stood up. I was expecting the national anthem to play or some sort of post-game rally. Even more so I was expecting there to be overtime, since no one had scored yet. Nope everyone was just leaving.

Getting home was a little rough, I found my way to the metro station, which was packed to the brim. Whoever designed this station was very smart and had a lot of foresight. To get in they had the full size revolving turnstile doors.  They limit the # of people who can go through at a time to 450 and then it stops and you have to wait a while, until the next train comes and goes. Once you go through you are able to switch your metro card quickly and easily, allowing the transport to get paid, and preventing potential damages from a riot to get through the gates. This also relieves congestion to get on a train. M5 is the only metro in Milan (that I have at least seen) that has the glass casings preventing anyone from getting pushed down into the tracks. After this experiences, I see where that design idea came from.

I think I’ll have to come back for another game, maybe on a day where the student section and seats are for sale. I had a great time at this one, and I’m excited for more. Go Italia!

About Mary

Studying on Exchange in Milan, Italy. Been to 9 countries and counting. Follow me as I dive deeper into new cultures and venture throughout the world.

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